Quick Movie Review: My Big Fat Greek Wedding (2002)

my big fat greek wedding

Boy, how well does this film holds up 14 years later. Can we finally admit to its greatness now?

Whatever tropes it derives from the rom-coms of old serve only to make us feel comfortable in its grasp. But don’t let the formula fool you. This film is anything but cloying. It opts out of cliche and sappy–instead, giving us rompy situations that we could actually see happening in our own lives.

Toula, played by Nia Vardalos, who also wrote the film, is a 30-year-old woman whose family fears will become an eternal spinster. She doesn’t seem to care about her appearance, and she is very awkward when it comes to talking to other people. She is of Greek origin, and her family won’t let her forget it. They’re the type who only talk to other Greek people. On the other hand, Toula doesn’t care.

She meets Ian (John Corbett), who isn’t Greek. They fall in love and want to get married, but have to deal with the wrath of her family–mostly her father, played by Michael Constantine.

The cast is perfect–especially Constantine, who we are often times convinced is Vardalos’ actual father playing himself.

The humor is mostly made of inside jokes from Greek culture. If you’re not savvy on that, you might think you won’t understand. But the script does an excellent job of not making us feel like an outsider. And most of us have families with weird traditions and tendencies, too, so we get it.

There are a few lulls in the narrative, but the script always recovers well with something funny around the corner.

My Big Fat Greek Wedding is truly funny in the most organic way possible. The scenarios all seem real. Vardalos is believable and hilarious in the lead role. She channels the sort of uninhibitedness that Lucille Ball was known for. Almost like a Kristen Wiig before her time.

But most of all, this film speaks to generations of society who can’t see past cultural differences. It was relevant back in 2002, and is still very much that way now. It’s a tale we’ve been seeing, in one way or another, for centuries now, but still can’t seem to get us to change our ways. Although no one’s life is at stake in this film, we could all learn a thing or two from the story. It’s deceptively deep.

Twizard Rating: 94

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